Floating Cities are a thing

Französisch-Polynesien hat ersten Tests für die Konstruktion schwimmender Städte zugestimmt und ich schätze, das dürfte zumindest für reichere Inselstaaten eine realistische Option angesichts des Klimawandels und steigender Meeresspiegel sein: modulare und damit ausbaubare schwimmende Schiffe. Damit bewahrt man die Marke vor dem Untergang und das Touristen-Paradies kann statt Kreuzfahrten eine neuartig zusammengeschraubte Solar-Schwimmstadt anbieten. Win-Win, außer für diejenigen Inselstaaten, die sich sowas nicht leisten können. Aber die kauft dann einfach jemand. Yay, Future!

NYTimes: Floating Cities, No Longer Science Fiction, Begin to Take Shape

Long the stuff of science fiction, so-called “seasteading” has in recent years matured from pure fantasy into something approaching reality, and there are now companies, academics, architects and even a government working together on a prototype by 2020. At the center of the effort is the Seasteading Institute, a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco. Founded in 2008, the group has spent about a decade trying to convince the public that seasteading is not an entirely crazy idea.

That has not always been easy. At times, the story of the seasteading movement seems to lapse into self parody. Burning Man gatherings in the Nevada desert are an inspiration, while references to the Kevin Costner film “Waterworld” are inevitable. The project is being partially funded by an initial coin offering, a new concept sweeping Silicon Valley and Wall Street in which money can be raised by creating and selling virtual currency.

And yet in 2017, with sea levels rising because of climate change and established political orders around the world teetering under the strains of populism, seasteading can seem not just practical, but downright appealing.

Earlier this year, the government of French Polynesia agreed to let the Seasteading Institute begin testing in its waters. Construction could begin soon, and the first floating buildings — the nucleus of a city — might be inhabitable in just a few years. “If you could have a floating city, it would essentially be a start-up country,” said Joe Quirk, president of the Seasteading Institute. “We can create a huge diversity of governments for a huge diversity of people.”

Hier eine ganze Reihe Renderings aus 'nem Video von Seasteading: