Links: Digital Moral Outrage changes Stimuli, Leia gifts a Tongue in a Box, Typesetting Mathematics

😈 Leia figured it out: Carrie Fisher gave predatory producer a cow's tongue in a box: Screenwriter Heather Robinson says that after telling Fisher she’d had to fight off a Hollywood executive, the Star Wars actor hand-delivered him the gift with a threatening note.

🤔 The Problem with #MeToo and Viral Outrage: „Three days into the #MeToo meme, my Facebook News Feed is teeming with posts. Female friends have shared heavy anecdotes about inappropriate events. Men have attempted to express solidarity, or concern, or surprise. Celebrities have run with the meme.“

Aus dem dort besprochenen Paper, Hervorhebungen von mir, für NC-Leser nichts neues: „Research on virality shows that people are more likely to share content that elicits moral emotions such as outrage5. Because outrageous content generates more revenue through viral sharing, natural selection-like forces may favour ‘supernormal’ stimuli that trigger much stronger outrage responses than do transgressions we typically encounter in everyday life. Supporting this hypothesis, there is evidence that immoral acts encountered online incite stronger moral outrage than immoral acts encountered in person or via traditional forms of media (Fig. 2b). These observations suggest that digital media transforms moral outrage by changing both the nature and prevalence of the stimuli that trigger it.“

🤥 I hate Clickbait: „Dear Entire World: #Viking ‘Allah’ textile actually doesn't have Allah on it.“

📖 Gerhard Steidl Is Making Books an Art Form: Steidl, who is sixty-six, is known for fanatical attention to detail, for superlative craftsmanship, and for embracing the best that technology has to offer. Edward Burtynsky, the Canadian photographer, who specializes in large-scale, painterly aerial images that show the impact of humans on the environment, said of Steidl’s operation, “It is like the haute couture of printing. He takes it to the _n_th degree.” Steidl seeks out the best inks, and pioneers new techniques for achieving exquisite reproductions. “He is so much better than anyone,” William Eggleston, the American color photographer, told me, when I met him recently in New York. Steidl has published Eggleston for a decade; two years ago, he produced an expanded, ten-volume, boxed edition of “The Democratic Forest,” the artist’s monumental 1989 work. Eggleston passed his hand through the air, in a stroking gesture. “Feel the pages of the books,” he said. “The ink is in relief. It is that thick.”

💻 Ghost in the cell: In the summer of 2015, Stan Transkiy was 16 years into a life sentence, and he had finally found a way to occupy his time.

🤖 How to Build a Self-Conscious Machine: The universe is full of some very cool stuff: neutron stars that weigh a ton a teaspoon; supermassive black holes that grip even light in their iron fists; infinitesimal neutrinos that stream right through solid steel; all the bizarre flora and fauna found right here on planet Earth.

🌆 Experimental City: The Sci-Fi Utopia That Never Was: With solar energy, recycling, computers, and personal mass transit, the 1960s-era Minnesota Experimental City was a prescient and hopeful vision of the urban future. A new documentary tells its story.

📖 From boiling lead and black art: An essay on the history of mathematical typography: I’ve always felt like constructing printed math was much more of an art form than regular typesetting. Someone typesetting mathematics is less a “typist” and more an artist attempting to render abstract data on a two-dimensional surface.

💥 Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars: For the first time, scientists have caught two neutron stars in the act of colliding, revealing that these strange smashups are the source of heavy elements such as gold and platinum.

🤖 A Former Clickhole Writer Made a ‘Content Bot’ That Will Probably Become My Boss: The following article was written by the human Claire Downs with no AI assistance. I've chuckled foolishly to myself, as reports of job-stealing automatons inevitably have surfaced, "I'm a writer.

🐬 Dolphins have ‘human-like’ societies...but are held back by a lack of opposable thumbs, say scientists: Whales and dolphins live in human-like societies and share similar brain evolution to primates and man, scientist have concluded. It is the first time that scientists have considered whether ‘social brain hypothesis’ applies to whales and dolphins, as well as humans.

👩‍🚀 Astronaut Scott Kelly on the devastating effects of a year in space: I'm sitting at the head of my dining room table at home in Houston, Texas, finishing dinner with my family: my longtime girlfriend Amiko, my twin brother Mark, his wife, former US congresswoman Gabby Giffords, his daughter Claudia, our father Richie and my daughters Samantha and Charlotte.