CT-Scans of fucking Dolphin-Genitalia

Wissenschaftler haben zusammen mit einer Expertin für „Penis-Aufblasen“ (lacht nicht!) erregierte Delfin-Pimmel gebastelt und penetrierten mit diesen simulierte Delfin-Mumus. SCIENCE! (Bild oben: „Blue and green marine mammal vaginal endocasts and their corresponding artificially inflated penises aligned to show the penetrant portions“).

Discover Mag: The Mechanics of Dolphin Sex: All The Dirty Details You Need To Know
Paper: Genital interactions during simulated copulation among marine mammals

Once pumped full of fluid, the penises were tied off and soaked in formalin to ensure they’d retain their engorged shape. Then, it was time to make the magic happen. “By looking at the shape of the vaginal endocasts and the penis shape, we were able to figure out which we thought would be to the best possible copulation,” Orbach explained. “Then we put the inflated penises inside the vagina, sewed them together, soaked them in iodine so they would be pretty well stained, and then did C.T. scans of them to look at how they fit together.” […]

In total, they were able to simulate intercourse for four species of marine mammals: harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis), and harbor seals (Phoca vitulina)—those were the only species they had high-quality male and female reproductive organs for (sadly, they did not have an intact orca vagina to pair with the larger-than-table-sized penis). They were also able to create digital 3D models of the penises and vaginas and simulate various rotations and positions to determine the deepest penetration possible.

The differences in reproductive anatomy between the species were impressive. Harbor porpoises, despite being the smallest species by body size, had the largest penises. “An erect harbor porpoise penis goes up to its chin—or, where its chin would be, if it were not a marine mammal,” Kelly said. And their vaginas are the most complex of the four, with “a whole bunch of spiraling folds,” Orbach explained, “which just keep twisting around… a little bit like a corkscrew.”