Terry Pratchett – Back in Black

Die BBC strahlte am Wochenende eine Doku über die unvollendete Autobiographie von Sir Terry Pratchett aus. Ich hab' den Film noch nicht angesehen, ist aber bereits für die Tage vorgemerkt und das Teil ist komplett auf Youtube (und anderen alternativen Distributionskanälen). „I chose a Wicker Casket to be laid to rest in because I always thought coffins were a bit morbid really not to mention claustrophobic.“

When the writer Sir Terry Pratchett died in 2015, he was working on one last story - his own. But Terry's Alzheimer's meant he never got to finish it.

This poignant and humorous film starring Paul Kaye as Terry finally tells the story of this hugely popular author, creator of Discworld, whose books have sold over 85 million copies worldwide. Back in Black reveals Terry's road to success was not always easy, from his troubled schooldays to being dismissed by literary critics, to his battle with Alzheimer's. But knighted by the Queen, adored by millions of fans and with a legacy of 41 much-loved novels - Terry Pratchett is still having the last laugh.

Review beim Guardian:

A couple of minutes into Back in Black, there’s a shot of Terry Pratchett’s head, outlined in twinkling lights hovering over his own memorial service at the Barbican Centre in London. It looks like a satellite photograph of some new country. As Auden said of Edward Lear: “He became a land.” And here are its people.

One of the charms of this docudrama is that it largely eschews the usual talking heads in favour of Discworld fans. Even the famous faces that do appear – Neil Gaiman, Pratchett’s consigliere Rob Wilkins, the illustrator Paul Kidby – first entered Pratchett’s orbit as fans. Whether it was the life-changing offer he made to collaborate with the young Gaiman on Good Omens, or the blessing to Stephen Briggs’s attempts to map Ankh-Morpork, or simply Tipp-Exing over an old dedication in a secondhand copy of one of his books so he could “unsign” it for its new owner, Pratchett showered his fans with favours like a Highland clan chief. It’s a clan with its own code of honour: to “be a bit more Terry” is to be kinder, more tolerant.