The Ambivalent Internet: Mischief, Oddity, and Antagonism Online

Gepostet vor 3 Monaten, 18 Tagen in #Kultur #Books #DasGeileNeueInternet #Trolls

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Whitney Phillips' This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things („this provocative book […] argues that trolling, widely condemned as obscene and deviant, actually fits comfortably within the contemporary media landscape“) liegt hier noch ungelesen auf meinem ständig anwachsenden DGNI-Bücherstapel (hatte ich damals hier verlinkt) und schon hat die Dame bereits ihr zweites Buch über Trolling angekündigt.

The Ambivalent Internet: Mischief, Oddity, and Antagonism Online erscheint im April, ich hab's grade vorbestellt und werde mir auch ein paar ihrer Trolling-Papers durchlesen. Hier der Klappentext:

1509501266This book explores the weird and mean and in-between that characterize everyday expression online, from absurdist photoshops to antagonistic Twitter hashtags to deceptive identity play.

Whitney Phillips and Ryan M. Milner focus especially on the ambivalence of this expression: the fact that it is too unwieldy, too variable across cases, to be essentialized as old or new, vernacular or institutional, generative or destructive. Online expression is, instead, all of the above. This ambivalence, the authors argue, hinges on available digital tools. That said, there is nothing unexpected or surprising about even the strangest online behavior. Ours is a brave new world, and there is nothing new under the sun - a point necessary to understanding not just that online spaces are rife with oddity, mischief, and antagonism, but why these behaviors matter.

The Ambivalent Internet is essential reading for students and scholars of digital media and related fields across the humanities, as well as anyone interested in mediated culture and expression.

Motherboard hat ein kurzes Interview mit Phillips, unten noch ein Video ihres TED-Talks von 2013, als sich der ganze Bohei erst langsam am Horizont abzeichnete:

Nearly a decade after Phillips began her journey into the darkest corners of the web to try and understand what lurks there, many of those elements have lept out of the shadows and onto the confirmation podium at the National Mall. Her upcoming book The Ambivalent Internet will explicitly touch on the role of trolls in modern American politics, which, as the book's name suggests, is rather Janus-faced.

Trolling might be the traditional domain of reactionary elements online, but recently progressives have started adopting similar tactics and branded themselves the "dirtbag left." These people are not above the brigading, ostensibly joking harassment, and irony that's become the trademark of pro-Trump trolls, but wielded for good instead of evil.

"Trolling can be a very effective strategy because it trades in the sensationalism that thrives in a click-based web economy," Phillips said. "It can be used to go after regressive positions, and I often think that's hilarious. At the same time, it's predicated on a highly gendered logic and the idea that I'm going to take away your ability to choose what happens to you and I'm going to dominate you. Is that something we want to normalize?"

Why study villains, scoundrels, and rule breakers? Whitney Phillips at TEDxCCS

Whitney Phillips, PhD, author and researcher, received her doctorate from thee University of Oregon in English with a Digital Culture/Folklore structured emphasis. Her Master of Fine Arts in creative writing is from Emerson College, and her bachelor's degree in Philosophy is from Humboldt State University. Whitney has published articles in First Monday,, Television and New Media, and Transformative Works and Cultures. She has taught in the Media, Culture and Communication department at New York University and is currently a faculty associate at Humboldt State. Whitney's work has been featured on CNN.com, the Atlantic, BBC Radio, NPR, and more. She is finishing her book that explores the cultural context of online trolling.

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