Original-Emoji von 1999 im Museum of Modern Art 🙂

Gepostet vor 1 Monat, 8 Tagen in Design Tech Share: Twitter Facebook Mail

emoji

Das MoMA New York hat Shigetaka Kuritas 176 Original Emoji von 1999 ihrer Sammlung hinzugefügt. Nach dem @-Zeichen vor sechs Jahren ihre nächste Unicode-Addition.

emoFrom its founding in 1991 by the Japanese national carrier Nippon Telegraph and Telephone, NTT DOCOMO was at the forefront of the burgeoning field of mobile communications. In keeping with Japan’s longstanding pioneering role in technological adoption, Japanese tech companies, and NTT DOCOMO in particular, were ahead of the curve in incorporating mobile Internet capabilities into cell phones. Early mobile devices, however, were rudimentary and visually unwieldy, capable of receiving only simple information about weather forecasts and basic text messaging. For the revolutionary “i-mode” mobile Internet software NTT DOCOMO was developing, a more compelling interface was needed. Shigetaka Kurita, who was a member of the i-mode development team, proposed a better way to incorporate images in the limited visual space available on cell phone screens. Released in 1999, Kurita’s 176 emoji (picture characters) were instantly successful and copied by rival companies in Japan. Twelve years later, when a far larger set was released for Apple’s iPhone, emoji burst into a new form of global digital communication.

Emoji tap into a long tradition of expressive visual language. Images and patterns have been incorporated within text since antiquity. From ancient examples to, more recently, the work of creative typesetters, these early specimens functioned as a means of augmenting both the expressive content of the text and the overall aesthetic quality of the printed page — and in some cases the icons were the language. With the advent of email in the 1970s and the subsequent evolution of concise, almost telegraphic correspondence, the conveyance of tone and emotion became both harder and more urgently important. Beginning in the 1980s, computer users in the West began composing emoticons to create simple faces out of preexisting glyphs — the ubiquitous smiley face :) is an example. In Japan, the larger character set necessitated by the language allowed for even more complicated images, giving rise to kaomoji, or picture faces, such as the now common shruggy: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. When combined with text, these simple images allow for more nuanced intonation. Filling in for body language, emoticons, kaomoji, and emoji reassert the human in the deeply impersonal, abstract space of electronic communication.

Tags: Art Emoji Typography

c1

█ Blackout █ Generative Censorship-Poetry

█ Blackout █ ist Liza Dalys Beitrag zum NaNoGenMo 2016 (National Novel Generation Month, das AlgoPoetry-Äquivalent zum NaNoWriMo), ein Algorithmus…

unnamed-20-600x400

Face Jagger – Fake „Cyber-Weapon“ auf einer Security Expo

Jakob S. Boeskov hat eine Fake „Cyber-Waffe“ namens Face Jagges auf eine Messe für Security- und Waffenfuzzis geschmuggelt. Er hatte…

schlaf

Making Of des Schlafzimmers in der Berliner U-Bahn

Rocco und seine Brüder sind das Kunstkollektiv, das Anfang des Jahres ein Schlafzimmer in der Berliner U-Bahn installierten. Jetzt gibt's…

delight

Hieronymus Boschs Garden of Earthly Delights, updated in 3D & 4k

Hieronymus Boschs Garten der Lüste in einer zeitgenössischen CGI-Interpretation in 4k von Studio Smack für die New Delights-Ausstellung des MOTI-Museums.…

ph4edsd5og2qbwe

Alison Jackson does Fake-Trump

Die großartige Alison Jackson – die Dame war post-fact before it was cool – hat für ihre berühmte Fotoserie voller…

abramovich

Trumpists loose their Shit because 70s Performance Art by Marina Abramovic

Grade wenn man denkt, der US-Wahlkampf könnte nicht noch bizarrer werden: Trump Supporters Think Hillary’s Campaign Manager Is A Satanic…

mixed_font

Neural Style Transfer für chinesische Fonts

Interessanter Ansatz für Type-Design: Neural Style Transfer For Chinese Fonts. (via Samim) Bei der Gestaltung von chinesischen Fonts müssen zehntausende…

ash11

Ash Dancer: Ein vibrierendes Skelett aus Graphit

Schicke Arbeit von Agelio Batle, ein knöcherner Riesenbleistift in Form eines Skeletts, das auf einer vibrierenden Papierunterlage rumschubbert und abstrakte…

9dbb44_5378a1f936d6427f9bbc5f641c8277a9-mv2_d_3296_2200_s_2

Russische Knast-Tattoos auf Kitsch-Keramik

Valeria Monis malt russische Knast-Tattoos auf kitschy Keramik-Teller. Die Motive dafür holt sie sich aus dem umfassenden Archiv von Danzig…

cvhotbtw8aarjk9

Berlin Typography

Meine Lieblingstweeties für die nächsten 5 Minuten: Berlin Typography.

fut1

Type Trap: Global Futura Hunt

Ein Social Image-Dingsbums zur Dokumentation der weltweiten Verbreitung von Paul Renners Futura: type trap is a social image platform that…