.doc Unzipped

Ich hatte dankenswerterweise in meinem Leben nur selten mit Word-Dokumenten zu tun. Ich wusste daher nicht, dass .docx-Files tatsächlich gepackte Container voller Crap sind. Aus einem Essay über RichText-Formate von den Leuten hinter dem hervorragenden iA Writer:

In Plain Text the text is the source. With Rich Text we see a simulation. What we see may please us, but below the surface our word processor secretly builds a more complex text in code. You can see this hidden world by creating a Pages or Word document, typing “Hello World” and saving, then changing the extension to .zip and unzipping the file. Welcome to 1979!

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If you are courageous enough to look inside the resulting folder, you may start wondering whether you typed “Hello World” or “Hello Hell”:

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In related News: Inside The Microsoft Office Olympics.

Technically called the Microsoft Office Specialist World Championship—and the Adobe Certified Associate World Championship—the competition, held this week in Dallas, is the latest in a 14-year run of annual tests meant to identify the very best practitioners of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign on the planet. […] To take part in these world championships, the contestants had to win national competitions at home. According to Craig Bushman, the vice president of marketing at Certiport, which hosts the world championships and which he said is the sole provider of the Microsoft Office Specialist certification, more than 800,000 people qualified to take part this year. […]

On the Office side, there were six separate competitions: one for each of the 2010 and 2013 versions of Excel, Word, and PowerPoint. All told, 145 people, all between the ages of 13 and 22, vied for the championships. Each of them spent 50 minutes diving deep into the gears of their chosen tool.

The Word entrants would have to tackle something like a newsletter and do things like modify headings to have word art, change certain fonts or paragraph styles, certain styles of indentations, or headers and footers, explained Bushman.

For Excel, the test included things like creating pivot tables in a spreadsheet, or sorting in specified formats.

And on PowerPoint, said Admon Lee Wen Xuan, who won first place in the 2010 category of the software, the task was to re-create a presentation, following the exact format specified in the instructions.