Bankspeak – The Language of World Bank Reports

Gepostet vor 2 Jahren, 2 Monaten in #Misc #Politics #Economy #Language

Share: Twitter Facebook Mail

Franco Moretti und Dominique Pestre in einem viel zu langen und viel zu interessanten Artikel über The Language of World Bank Reports. TL;DR: Die Sprache des Weltbank-Berichts wurde in den vergangenen 60 Jahren immer allgemeiner und nichtssagender („words like commodities, or improvements raise the analysis to a higher level of abstraction than, say, hydroelectric plants and cement“), gleichzeitig hat sich der Gebrauch des Wortes „und“ nahezu verdoppelt, weil man noch mehr nichtssagende Scheinbegriffe aneinanderreiht. Alles keine wirklich neuen Erkenntnisse, dennoch extrem interessant.

3260405

Issues, players, concern, efforts, platforms, dialogue, ground… ‘The whole tendency of modern prose is away from concreteness’, wrote Orwell in ‘Politics and the English Language’, and his words are as true today as they were in 1946. The Bank stresses the importance of what it’s saying — key, global, innovative, enlightened — but its words are hopelessly opaque. […]

‘Bankspeak’, we have written, echoing Orwell’s famous neologism; but there is one crucial difference between the lexicographers of 1984 and the Bank’s ghost writers. Whereas the former were fascinated by annihilation (‘It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words… every year fewer and fewer words, and the range of consciousness always a little smaller’), the latter have a childish delight in multiplying words, and most particularly nouns. The frequency of nouns in academic prose is usually just below 30 per cent; in World Bank Reports it has always been significantly higher, and has increased slowly and regularly over the years. It is the perfect rhetoric to bring the ‘world’ inside the ‘bank’: a ‘chaotic enumeration’ of disparate realities—to quote an expression coined by Leo Spitzer—that suggests an endlessly expanding universe, encouraging a sense of admiration and wonder rather than critical understanding.

New Left Review: BANKSPEAK – The Language of World Bank Reports

Gun-Emoji Pairings 🔫😶

Interesting analysis of the Gun-Emoji-Pairings: „What does the Gun shoot at?“ and „Who pulls the Trigger?“

The Power of Language

„In this reel, we explore the incredible power of language—written, spoken and performed. First, meet the creator of Game of…

Anthony Burgess lost Dictionary of Slang discovered

Die International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester hat neulich das verlorene Slang-Wörterbuch von Anthony Burgess im Keller gefunden („at the…

Neural Network Genesis Alpha

Douglas Summers hat das erste Buch Genesis der Bibel mit Neural Network Voodoo in Worte übersetzt, die allesamt mit dem…

Podcasts: Sid Vicious, Baudrillards Simulacra, das Wörterbuch der Unruhe und das Märchen vom unglaublichen Super-Kim aus Pjöngjang

Jede Menge Podcasts und Hörspiele, die ich in den letzten Wochen gehört habe, unter anderem ein Hörspiel um einen mutierenden…

Urban Dictionary Anagrams, ranked

Sean Carney hat die Anagramme aus dem Urban Dictionary ermittelt und mit einem Algorithmus sortiert: How to Find Anagrams on…

Social Media based Substance Use Detection

Shit, they got me. (I think they follow me on Twitter, too. Damn. [Not really.]) Table 6 is hilarious: In…

15000yrs old ultraconserved Words from the Stone-Age found in present Languages

[update] Der verlinkte Artikel ist vier Jahre (hatte ich nicht gesehen), hier eine ausführliche Kritik im Languagelog: „The authors intend…

Do not pet a Snip Snap Doggo

I find this funnier than I should: this is the only video i need pic.twitter.com/uxN7AIc2X2 — Dank Memes 💎💎💎 (@FreeMemesKids)…

Burning Banks

Alex Shaeffer malt seit Occupy Wallstreet gerne brennende Banken. Die Motive sind großartig, die Pinsel-Technik wackelt noch manchmal, aber okay.…

Predictive Policing for Banksters

Schönes Ding von Sam Lavigne, Predictive Policing für Wirtschaftskriminalität im Finanzsektor, 'ne Robocop-App für Bankster. White Collar Crime Risk Zones…