Mummified Monk hidden inside Buddha-Statue

buddah

Das Drents Museum in den Niederlanden hat letztes Jahr eine Buddha-Statue in einen CT-Scanner gelegt und darin einen mumifizierten Mönch gefunden.

buddah2This Buddha statue was exhibited earlier this year in an exhibition in the Drents Museum (where it was shown for the first time outside China). The mummified body of the Buddhist master Liuquan, a monk who lived around the year 1100 and who belonged to the Chinese Meditation School, is hidden in this precious reliquary dating from the eleventh or twelfth century. - See more at: http://www.robswebstek.com/2014/12/buddha-statue-with-mummy-in-hospital.html#sthash.lQOC1EzT.dpuf

Buddha Statue with Mummy in Hospital (via Neatorama)

[update] Mehr dazu im History-Blog:

The mummy is believed to be that of the Master Liuquan of the Chinese Meditation School, or Ch’an (known as Zen in Japan) Buddhism. He died around 1100 A.D., which is the source of the date for the statue. The Drents Museum exhibited the statue as an example of self-mummification, a grueling, torturous, years-long process in which Buddhist monks gradually starved, dehydrated and poisoned themselves in the hope of attaining enlightenment and leaving an incorruptible corpse. It required an almost inconceivable degree of self-abnegation. For the first 1,000 days they ate only nuts and seeds gleaned from the area around the temple. The next 1,000 days the diet was whittled down to small portions of pine bark and roots until the end of the period when they began to drink a tea made from the sap of urushi tree. This sap is what lacquer is made of; it is toxic to humans. The tea induced the release of fluids and made the body unappetizing to insects and microorganisms that would otherwise be inclined feast on the corpse.