Cocaine Inc: The Business-Model of Mexicos Sinaloa Cartel

Die NYTimes hat einen grandiosen und ziemlich langen Artikel über das mexikanische Drogenkartel und dessen Boss El Chapo. Real Life Breaking Bad oder auch die Details zu Tony Montanas Geschäftsmodell inklusive „Webcomic“ bzw. Illustrationen von Steve McNiven (Zeichner von Mark Millars „Nemesis“, viel für Marvel, das Cover von Kick-Ass #1 etc.) Im Bild links unten löst ein Subunternehmer des Sinaloa Kartells einen Konkurrenten in Säure auf. Absolutes Must-Read!

The Sinaloa cartel can buy a kilo of cocaine in the highlands of Colombia or Peru for around $2,000, then watch it accrue value as it makes its way to market. In Mexico, that kilo fetches more than $10,000. Jump the border to the United States, and it could sell wholesale for $30,000. Break it down into grams to distribute retail, and that same kilo sells for upward of $100,000 — more than its weight in gold. And that’s just cocaine. Alone among the Mexican cartels, Sinaloa is both diversified and vertically integrated, producing and exporting marijuana, heroin and methamphetamine as well.

Estimating the precise scale of Chapo’s empire is tricky, however. Statistics on underground economies are inherently speculative: cartels don’t make annual disclosures, and no auditor examines their books. Instead, we’re left with back-of-the-envelope extrapolations based on conjectural data, much of it supplied by government agencies that may have bureaucratic incentives to overplay the problem.

So in a spirit of empirical humility, we shouldn’t accept as gospel the estimate, from the Justice Department, that Colombian and Mexican cartels reap $18 billion to $39 billion from drug sales in the United States each year. (That range alone should give you pause.) Still, even if you take the lowest available numbers, Sinaloa emerges as a titanic player in the global black market. In the sober reckoning of the RAND Corporation, for instance, the gross revenue that all Mexican cartels derive from exporting drugs to the United States amounts to only $6.6 billion. By most estimates, though, Sinaloa has achieved a market share of at least 40 percent and perhaps as much as 60 percent, which means that Chapo Guzmán’s organization would appear to enjoy annual revenues of some $3 billion — comparable in terms of earnings to Netflix or, for that matter, to Facebook.

Cocaine Incorporated – How a Mexican Drug Cartel Makes Its Billions (via Reddit)