Kevin Kelly interviews Hacker Historian George Dyson

Superspannendes Interview von Kevin Kelly mit George Dyson, der auf dem Campus aufgewachsen ist, an dem sie den ersten Computer gebaut haben.

Wired: Because your father, Freeman Dyson, worked at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, you grew up around folks who were building one of the first computers. Was that cool?

George Dyson: The institute was a pretty boring place, full of theoreticians writing papers. But in a building far away from everyone else, some engineers were building a computer, one of the first to have a fully electronic random-access memory. For a kid in the 1950s, it was the most exciting thing around. I mean, they called it the MANIAC! The computer building was off-limits to children, but Julian Bigelow, the chief engineer, stored a lot of surplus electronic equipment in a barn, and I grew up playing there and taking things apart.

Wired: Did that experience influence how you thought about computers later?

Dyson: Yes. I tried to get as far away from them as possible.

Q&A: Hacker Historian George Dyson Sits Down With Wired’s Kevin Kelly