Measuring the Lulz of funny Videos with the amount of O in the LOLs

Gepostet vor 5 Jahren, 4 Monaten in #Misc #Comedy #Google #Language

Share: Twitter Facebook Mail

Google hält grade 'nen Comedy-Slam ab und lässt User für die lustigsten Videos abstimmen. So weit, so uninteressant. Die Kandidaten für die Videos haben sie aber unter anderem dadurch ausgesucht, indem sie die LOLs in den Comments semantisch untersucht haben – und das ist im Gegensatz zu Muhaha-Videos tatsächlich sehr interessant:

We needed an algorithm to rank these funny videos by comedic potential, e.g. is “Charlie bit my finger” funnier than “David after dentist”? Raw viewcount on its own is insufficient as a ranking metric since it is biased by video age and exposure. We noticed that viewers emphasize their reaction to funny videos in several ways: e.g. capitalization (LOL), elongation (loooooool), repetition (lolololol), exclamation (lolllll!!!!!), and combinations thereof. If a user uses an “loooooool” vs an “loool”, does it mean they were more amused? We designed features to quantify the degree of emphasis on words associated with amusement in viewer comments. We then trained a passive-aggressive ranking algorithm using human-annotated pairwise ground truth and a combination of text and audiovisual features. Similar to Music Slam, we used this ranker to populate candidates for human voting for our Comedy Slam.

Quantifying comedy on YouTube: why the number of o’s in your LOL matter (via /.)

Gun-Emoji Pairings 🔫😶

Interesting analysis of the Gun-Emoji-Pairings: „What does the Gun shoot at?“ and „Who pulls the Trigger?“

The Power of Language

„In this reel, we explore the incredible power of language—written, spoken and performed. First, meet the creator of Game of…

Anthony Burgess lost Dictionary of Slang discovered

Die International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester hat neulich das verlorene Slang-Wörterbuch von Anthony Burgess im Keller gefunden („at the…

Neural Network Genesis Alpha

Douglas Summers hat das erste Buch Genesis der Bibel mit Neural Network Voodoo in Worte übersetzt, die allesamt mit dem…

Podcasts: Sid Vicious, Baudrillards Simulacra, das Wörterbuch der Unruhe und das Märchen vom unglaublichen Super-Kim aus Pjöngjang

Jede Menge Podcasts und Hörspiele, die ich in den letzten Wochen gehört habe, unter anderem ein Hörspiel um einen mutierenden…

Urban Dictionary Anagrams, ranked

Sean Carney hat die Anagramme aus dem Urban Dictionary ermittelt und mit einem Algorithmus sortiert: How to Find Anagrams on…

Social Media based Substance Use Detection

Shit, they got me. (I think they follow me on Twitter, too. Damn. [Not really.]) Table 6 is hilarious: In…

15000yrs old ultraconserved Words from the Stone-Age found in present Languages

[update] Der verlinkte Artikel ist vier Jahre (hatte ich nicht gesehen), hier eine ausführliche Kritik im Languagelog: „The authors intend…

Do not pet a Snip Snap Doggo

I find this funnier than I should: this is the only video i need pic.twitter.com/uxN7AIc2X2 — Dank Memes 💎💎💎 (@FreeMemesKids)…

140 Minutes of Sheldon talking to Craig Ferguson

Der YT-Channel The Stories of Bob postet seit zwei Wochen jede Menge Supercuts der Interviews aus Craig Fergusons LateLateNight. Die…

Daddy Cthulhu Cumshot: Weird Algo-Poetry from repetitive Cut'n'Paste-Autocomplete

Das LanguageLog hat die „psychedellic“ AI-„Dreaming of“-Technik auf Google Translate angewandt und dort regelmäßige Sprach/Zeichen-Muster („Iä! Iä! Iä! Iä! Iä!…