Anthropocene Cartography: Mapping the World of human Activity

Superfaszinierendes Projekt von Globaïa, die ein neues Erdzeitalter vorschlagen: Das Anthropocene (Anthropozän), das vor allem durch die Einflussname des Menschen auf den Planeten geprägt ist. Dazu haben sie menschliche Aktivitäten auf der Erde in globalen Karten visualisiert. Toll!

 Vimeo Direktmaps, via /.

The Anthropocene. […] Officially, this epoch does not exist. Yet. It may be added permanently to the geologic time scale in August 2012, at the 34th congress organized by the International Union of Geological Sciences, to be held in Brisbane, Australia. It is the International Commission on Stratigraphy that determines the denomination and the calibration of different divisions and subdivisions of geological time, which date back to the formation of the Earth, 4.6 billion years ago. […]

The term was proposed in 2000 by Paul J. Crutzen, Nobel Prize in 1995 for his work on atmospheric chemistry and his research on stratospheric ozone depletion (the so-called "hole"), and by Eugene F. Stoermer in a publication (p. 17) of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. But the concept itself, the idea that human activity affects the Earth to the point where it can cross a new age, is not new and dates back to the late nineteenth century. Different terms were proposed over the decades, such as Anthropozoic (Stoppani, 1873), Noosphere (de Chardin, 1922; Vernadsky, 1936), Eremozoic (Wilson, 1992), and Anthrocene (Revkin, 1992). It seems that the success of the term chosen by Crutzen and Stoermer is due to the luck of having been made at the appropriate time, when humankind became more than ever aware of the extent of its impact on global environment. It should be noted that Edward O. Wilson (who suggested Eremozoic, "the age of loneliness") popularized the terms "biodiversity" and "biophilia."

Technically, the Anthropocene is the most recent period of the Quaternary, succeding to the Holocene. The Quaternary is a period of the Earth's history characterized by numerous and cyclical glaciations, starting 2,588,000 years ago (2.588 Ma). The Quaternary is divided into three epochs: the Pleistocene, the Holocene, and now the Anthropocene. […]

We are officially still in the Holocene. In fact, we are in the Phanerozoic Eon, Cenozoic era, Quaternary period and Holocene epoch. But now, the Earth's system does not seem to behave the same way as, say, at the time of Hesiod, Dante or Cervantes. The Earth of the 21st century is warming, overcrowded, partly deforested, and more toxic and interconnected than ever. The comforting envelope of the Holocene, which has fostered the birth of civilizations, is now punctured.

We collectively rolled over into a new era, which includes its stakes and challenges but also its opportunities and great qualities. This page is dedicated to exploring this new world in a visual way.