Where Monsters Come From

Das Life Mag hat eine schöne Galerie voller Monster, wo sie herkommen und wo ihre historischen Wurzeln liegen. Das da oben ist Rangda, die „child-eating, tusk-faced, long-taloned queen of demons on the Indonesian island of Bali, Rangda is symbolically defeated by the lionesque king of good spirits during the Barong dance.“ Etwas Internet-kompatibler ist aber wahrscheinlich die japanische Monster-Cat:

The bakaneko, or "monster-cat," is a Japanese legend that arose centuries ago, in which a regular house cat turns into a monster once it lives for 100 years, exceeds 8 1/4 pounds in weight, or keeps a long tail. The monster-cat then terrorizes villagers by walking on two legs, devouring anything it feels like, changing shape to resemble human loved ones, and bringing the dead back to life by leaping over their corpses. Some believe that the superstition about long-tailed cats is what gave rise to the first Japanese bobtails (pictured).

Where Monsters Come From