Die Einflüsse der Star Wars-Ästhetik

John Powers hat einen fantastischen Essay über die Einlüsse der Ästhetik von Star Wars geschrieben, in dem er den Spuren von Kunst und Vorbildern in Todessternen und Sturmtruppen nachgeht.

Lucas unabashedly emulated the visuals of Stanley Kubrick’s film 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), which incorporated the principles of modernist architecture (spare, utilitarian, evenly lit spaces) and the presence of a minimalist slab (colorless, drab, depersonalized, inscrutable non-art). The only ornamental flourishes in the film were borrowed from NASA (whitewashed modular construction pocked by latches, struts, and access panels) and corporate furniture design (steel, leather, powder-coat enamel, and blobby red Dijinn).

Lucas hired so many members of Kubrick’s team that their subset of the Star Wars crew was dubbed “The Class of 2001.” But he borrowed selectively. Kubrick’s 2001 environments were cohesive and balanced, informed by architectural theory and late-’60s aesthetics; they upheld the distinction between the astronaut modernists and the alien minimalists. By contrast, Lucas willfully mashed together minimalism, modernism, and NASA design. Two visual rhetorics are at war on-screen: The first is that of an industrial superpower; the second is that of a rogue fringe of misfits and mismatches.

Star Wars – A New Heap (via Tor)